Dull Won’t Do

Boring, blank walls are a thing of the past for one Australian government building, thanks to Bailey Print Group.

When a local Australian government agency opened a new office, they wanted to spice up the typical staid style often associated with an official government department. To ditch the bland white walls and create a welcoming space for clients, which often includes children, Bailey Print Group was called on to craft vibrant wallcoverings for the office.

Graphics featuring the silhouettes of children and families playing under a colorful tree welcome visitors in the reception area. To maintain durability and longevity in that high-traffic spot, Bailey Print Group used HP PVC-free, paste-up wallpaper output using an HP Latex 1500. 

The PSP used a linen-look Augusta Wall Graphics self-adhesive wallcovering printed with the HP Latex 1500 for additional walls throughout the office. “This gave the client the flexibility to refresh the creative quickly and at minimal cost due to the self-adhesive nature,” says Samantha Bailey-Jensen, business development manager for Bailey Print Group.

A training room that hosts several educational courses throughout the year was the ideal space for Visual Magnetics wallcovering with graphics printed using an Océ Arizona 460 XT. A training room that hosts several educational courses throughout the year was the ideal space for Visual Magnetics wallcovering with graphics printed using an Océ Arizona 460 XT. The client wanted to avoid utilizing single-use posters each time they had a class, says Bailey-Jensen. The solution? They installed two layers of magnetic wallcovering, including speech bubbles that could serve as a reusable whiteboard. Three workers spent one day installing all the graphic elements for the project. 

The government office project was just one recent example of the Brisbane, Australia-based PSP’s expansion into the printed interiors market, which was spurred by a move from solvent to the more eco-friendly latex wide-format printers. With added capabilities of new technology, Bailey-Jensen says Bailey Print Group saw interior décor as an opportunity to diversify into a less crowded – and less price-driven – market, while also still providing traditional print services.

“We believed in the concept of the ‘printerior’ market so much we totally redesigned our showroom to be an experiential space where clients can visit to see and touch an array of printerior displays, from glass-beaded wallcoverings to frameless canvas-look wall art, a bespoke lamp shade, ottomans, and fabrics.” (For more on Bailey Print Group’s entry into interior décor, see Rachel Nunziata's latest Beyond Décor column.)

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