A Dream Wrap Come True

Palmer Signs images a vintage movie set-themed food truck wrap.

In "Keep On Truckin'," Associate Editor Kelsey Johnson gets the scoop on three food truck wraps created by Roseville, California's Palmer Signs. All featured graphics were imaged with the shop’s HP Latex 570 printer onto 3M Controltac Graphic Film with Comply Adhesive IJ180C, finished with 3M Scotchcal Gloss Overlaminate 8518.

Where can you order chicken and waffles, shrimp po’boys, Italian sausage, and Hawaiian macaroni salad, all off the same menu? The Dreamland Dining food truck, owned by a chef who’s lived in Texas and Hawaii, marries the distinct flavors of both places into an eclectic menu offering “Southern-style comfort foods and rich island flavors,” says Tony Palmer, Palmer Signs CEO and owner.

Designing a wrap and menu that represents Dreamland’s unique fare presented Palmer Signs with an interesting creative challenge. The solution they crafted is a vintage movie set theme featuring “trees that look like propped up, painted boards and a bright, almost mid-century musical color palette,” Palmer says.  The PSP incorporated palm trees and Texas oak trees “to bridge the two landscapes, and added a white picket fence on the beach with a sunset, which can be indicative of both Texas and the Hawaiian Islands.” The shop chose a font that could be stylized to look like a drop-down theater stage sign hanging in front of the set, and mounted a steel panel to the menu area so Dreamland can update its menu as needed with magnets designed to look like boards hanging with stage rope. Palmer Signs made sure to list a variety of diverse food options across the top of the truck to immediately give onlookers a taste of Dreamland’s multifaceted menu.

Designing a wrap and menu that represents Dreamland’s unique fare presented Palmer Signs with an interesting creative challenge. The solution they crafted is a vintage movie set theme featuring “trees that look like propped up, painted boards and a bright, almost mid-century musical color palette,” Palmer says. 

The PSP incorporated palm trees and Texas oak trees “to bridge the two landscapes, and added a white picket fence on the beach with a sunset, which can be indicative of both Texas and the Hawaiian Islands.” The shop chose a font that could be stylized to look like a drop-down theater stage sign hanging in front of the set, and mounted a steel panel to the menu area so Dreamland can update its menu as needed with magnets designed to look like boards hanging with stage rope. Palmer Signs made sure to list a variety of diverse food options across the top of the truck to immediately give onlookers a taste of Dreamland’s multifaceted menu.

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