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Promoting the Games of 2010

(May 2006) posted on Thu May 25, 2006

SuperGraphics Canada helps Canada promote the next Winter Olympics.


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During the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino (aka Turin), Italy, the Province of British Columbia, Canada wanted a way to promote itself as the destination for the 2010 Winter games.

Its solution was "British Columbia-Canada Place"?"?a temporary 6,500-square-foot pavilion comprising a classic ski-resort-style log house (built in Canada from British Columbia pine and then shipped to Italy and assembled on site) complemented by an existing modern glass exhibit hall. The warmth and primitiveness of the log cabin represented rural British Columbia while the exhibit hall represented the province"?s modern and high-tech side. The structures would showcase British Columbia as the 2010 games site, and also be used as a space for Canadian organizations to hold meetings, receptions, and seminars during the 2006 games.

Joining the two disparate structures together, visually as well as physically, would be the design"?s centerpiece: a soaring red and white, mountain-shaped flag graphic that would provide a backdrop and highlight the Log House and Exhibit Hall.

To develop British Columbia-Canada Place, the province of British Columbia had turned to two Canadian companies: graphic-design firm Lunny International, and exhibit/event company Creatix Studios. For the flag graphic"?as well as exterior graphics for the exhibit hall--one more company was added to the mix: print provider SuperGraphics Canada.

Production

Lunny International, in collaboration with Creatix, used Adobe Illustrator to create the two flag images, then passed the files on to SuperGraphics for output.

The double-sided, mountain-shaped representation of the Canadian flag would measure 150-ft wide x 50-ft tall x 4-ft deep. The British Columbia flag representation for the glass structure was to measure 85-ft wide x 30-ft high. Since the Log House had not been constructed at the time of the design and output processes, Lunny and SuperGraphics were only able to work with design drawings"?essentially blueprints"?not actual building dimensions. Meanwhile, another Canadian company was working to produce the custom scaffolding that would support the graphics on both buildings.

SuperGraphics used its Vutek UltraVu 5300 with ColorBurst RIP and Vutek Inkware inks to image both flags onto Ultraflex Ultramesh 100. Prior to final output, the company produced press proofs on the Vutek for approval. "They wanted to verify that the open mesh would carry the color,"? says David Woodman, SuperGraphics Canada"?s general manager.

After SuperGraphics received the go-ahead for final printing, total output for both graphics took 50 hours. The company then had to finish the graphics with sewing, grommeting, and Velcro using Juki sewers and Micron grommeters. Finishing time took 90 hours, both graphics. "We had to add plenty of reinforcement webbing and grommets in strategic places,"? says Woodman. "Webbing was sewn around the perimeter and into strategic locations where we placed grommets so they wouldn"?t tear out in a high wind."?

Graphics and scaffolding were shipped from Canada to Italy, and installed onsite. SuperGraphics Canada sent a project manager as a "lead hand"? to oversee install, which was executed by Lunny and Creatix personnel.

Comment

"The graphics had to be fabricated exactly--so when they put it all together, it was just like being fitted into a glove,"? says Woodman. "It doesn"?t always go this smoothly, but it sure did here."?

Client

Province of British Columbia, Canada

The Players

Design: Lunny International (www.lunny.com)

Exhibit planning: Creatix Studios (www.creatixstudios.com)

Print provider: SuperGraphics Canada (www.supergraphics.ca)

Tools & Supplies

Vutek UltraVu 5300 printer with ColorBurst RIP, Vutek and Inkware inks; Juki sewers; Micron grommeters


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