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Success and Sustainability

(March 2012) posted on Wed Mar 14, 2012

Five print providers who have plotted out a green course.


By Paula Yoho

click an image below to view slideshow

Let’s face it: Sustainability in graphics has not been on the smoothest of flight paths. Generally, “going green” is in vogue as long as the budget can accommodate it. How green a customer goes is typically dependent on the marketing plan’s purse strings and the economy in general: Big surplus in the budget? Think emerald. So-so economy? Think lime green. Nearly depleted budget? Olive drab comes to mind.

But if the economy’s needle is ready to make a shift toward the “full” vs “empty” side of the budgetary gas tank, then isn’t it likely that your clients will, once again, be willing to invest in sustainable options for their graphics? And shouldn’t you then be ready to take on those types of jobs?

This month, we introduce you to five print providers whose sustainability efforts are worth noting – they’re putting their own unique stamp on what it means to be a green graphics company in 2012.

Methodical research: Premier Press
Sustainability is as ingrained in the business culture at Premier Press (premierpress.com) in Portland, Oregon, as it is in the community the company calls home.

“Being from Portland, our culture here has a pretty strong focus on operating sustainably. Our state was the first to introduce a bottle bill so that we didn’t have garbage along the roadsides, and it started the recycling mentality for us,” says CEO Jodi Krohn.

“About 15 years ago, we were the first printer in our area that operated with solely soy-based inks in our presses. That was a challenge to switch from what was then the traditional inks to soy-based inks or vegetable-based inks, but our pressmen were very personally invested in making that sustainability work, and that was a pretty big first step.”

Krohn, who runs the company with her sisters and parents, says Premier Press prides itself on being a family business that welcomes and encourages input from its 125 employees.


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