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Roland Adds Benchtop UV Flatbed Printer

The VersaUV LEF-300 features expanded printing area.

Big Picture

Roland has introduced the VersaUV LEF-300, a new 30-in. benchtop UV-LED flatbed printer for graphics printing on a variety of substrates, including three-dimensional objects. The new model extends the width of the LEF-20 by 10 in., bringing the printable area to 30 x 13 in. on objects up to 3.94 in. thick. Possible media include PET, ABS, polycarbonate, TPU, leather, phone and laptop cases, signage, and promotional products; a built-in vacuum table holds thin and soft materials in place to simplify setup and reduce mistakes.

The machine offers potential for both one-off and high-volume applications. Its ability to print to a variety of materials enables users to customize accessories on-demand or even onsite with photographs, artwork, branding, and more. Conversely, an input/output system for external devices such as warning lights and custom automation systems can help print providers utilize the machine for mass production.

Leveraging four printheads and two UV-LED lamps, Roland reports that the LEF-300’s bidirectional printing is roughly 60% faster than that of the LEF-20. The company has also doubled the number of white and clear ink nozzles with this model, a change engineered to increase speed, density, and opacity, as well as quicken the buildup of multiple layers to create three-dimensional textures. The printer also features a new draft print mode for rapid prototyping.

The LEF-300 employs the company’s proprietary EUV4 ink, designed to reduce odor and the shrinking of thin materials during curing. The inks are available in 220-mL cartridges or, with the exception of white, 500-mL.

The printer sits atop a BOFA air filtration system which multitasks as a ventilator as well as a stand and storage unit. It is also equipped with Roland’s VersaWorks Dual RIP software, which supports native PostScript and PDF files in addition to handling design tasks such as offset, positioning, rotation, ink layer registration, and creation of white and clear ink effects.

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